Understanding Bullying and Cyberbullying: Applying Laws and Best Practices

While bullying is a complex social and educational problem, cooperation among schools and families, as guided and instructed by state and federal laws, can help build stronger, harmonious school communities free from bullying.

BY John T. Spoede Jr., Ph.D., D.Min., LPC-S, LCDC, NCC, CSC and Angela Spoede, J.D. | September 2018 | Category: Education

Understanding Bullying  and Cyberbullying: Applying Laws and Best Practices

As our schools play increasingly important roles in the social and emotional health and development of our children, laws are following suit and addressing issues like bullying and cyberbullying.

Historically, bullying has been addressed through existing criminal and civil statutes prohibiting discriminatory harassment, assault, and various other offenses. For example, federal education law requires that schools receiving federal funding must take action to address discriminatory harassment based on race, disability, religion, or other protected groups, that is so severe that it affects the victim’s ability to participate in school activities (see, e.g., Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and the IDEA).

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